An Anthropologist from Another Planet Visits Writing Workshop

Anthropology demands the open-mindedness with which one
must look and listen, record in astonishment and wonder that
which one would not have been able to guess.

~Margaret Mead

I am impressed with the scratch-scratch of writing instruments that move across the page. Here, there seems to be choice. The youngsters, probably varying from nine to eleven years in age, use pencils of all sizes, sharpened to a point. Many of them have “No. 2” printed on the side and a pink eraser that sits like a top hat but does not seem to be used. These students cross out their mistakes by drawing a thin line through the unwanted word or words. It is as if they still want to keep the words they are tossing away, or perhaps they are not sure of their value and will decide when the work is finished. Others favor an instrument called the pen. These writing instruments come in many colors and their marks on the page are largely blue or black. Every so often, a student writer paints the page with words in pink and red and purple. Turquoise blue, tangerine orange, and lime green are also favorites.

A few students sit at computers and tap away at the keyboards. They are not yet able to pass the words to the screen or the paper by thinking them. Perhaps, that is a gift I can pass to them before I leave.  I walk by children who engage in serious conversation in whisper voices.  They do not look at me. The writers are so focused. Their eyes light up as they share the words they have written on the page. I can almost feel the flutter of their hearts as they praise and polish each other’s work. They are eager to hear what their peers have to say about their work. The writers nod and scribble on little squares of paper, sometimes passing these squares to their partner.

The room is filled with writing and whispering voices and everywhere, there are charts – yes, as I look around the room, it seems everything is homegrown. Where is the transmitter of knowledge? The children call him “teacher.” Ah, there he is, sitting on the carpet, and he, too, is writing in a small notebook. He stops for a moment, looks around the room, and smiles. I will come back again tomorrow to observe this thing they call writing workshop. I must admit, it feels somewhat like a magical experience to me.  I feel compelled to share this story with anyone who will listen. slice-of-life2

 

 

18 thoughts on “An Anthropologist from Another Planet Visits Writing Workshop

  1. Totally magical, Lynne! What a fun slice!
    This I adore . . .”These students cross out their mistakes by drawing a thin line through the unwanted word or words. It is as if they still want to keep the words they are tossing away, or perhaps they are not sure of their value and will decide when the work is finished.”
    You are such a master of observation! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I read this first thing this morning and it gave me hope from what I strive for in my writing workshop! You captured the essence of writers hard at work and in their own heads trying to find just the right words. Your words made me feel like I was in the classroom with you.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The #2 pencil is still one of my favorite writing implements. I love your observations. “They do not look at me. The writers are so focused. Their eyes light up as they share the words they have written on the page.” This is what it is all about.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. YES! This is the hum of workshop that is so magical. I love where you say, “as I look around the room, it seems everything is homegrown.” I think about the ownership of those learners in creating that space! Great way to kick of the SOL, Lynne!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I love a good #2 pencil. Writing, for me, on a computer seems like “work”, but seeing the words appear from a pencil….magical! Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Such a thoughtful and vivid description of your observations in Writing Workshop! Writing workshop is such a magical time! How amazing it would be for all students to experience the magic of writing. I always love to read your writing, Lynne. So very inspiring!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. What a clever perspective for your slice! Oh, I love this : “These students cross out their mistakes by drawing a thin line through the unwanted word or words. It is as if they still want to keep the words they are tossing away, or perhaps they are not sure of their value and will decide when the work is finished. “

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Love this: to observe this thing they call writing workshop. I must admit, it feels somewhat like a magical experience to me. I feel compelled to share this story with anyone who will listen.
    Love you!!
    So glad you are slicing this month. I will treasure every day and then we celebrate at MRA in April!!!
    Clare

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I was an Anthropology major back in college and Writers Workshop is my favorite thing to teach! Thank you for combining my loves in your mini ethnography. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  10. The description of the writing instruments made me smile and wonder what other professions think when we call pens and pencils by different names. I love how I feel like part of the story, almost as if the narrator is a fly on the wall. I love reading stories like this!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. This is a great way to sum up the beauty of a well-run writing workshop. I love the hum of busy and engaged students in the classroom! You are always so creative in your posts, and they are very inspiring.

    Liked by 1 person

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